Vaudeville – Dirty Blonde –

Vaudeville 

Vaudeville is a term you will hear referenced in Triad Stage’s spring production of Dirty Blonde.  According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, in the United States the term connotes a light entertainment popular from the mid-1890s until the early 1930s that consisted of 10 to 15 individual unrelated acts, featuring magicians, acrobats, comedians, trained animals, jugglers, singers, and dancers.  It is the counterpart of the music hall and variety in England.


Did you know?

The term vaudeville, adopted in the United States from the Parisian boulevard theatre, is probably a corruption of vaux-de-vire, satirical songs in couplets, sung to popular airs in the 15th century in the Val-de-Vire (Vau-de-Vire), Normandy, France.

It passed into theatrical usage in the early 18th century to describe a device employed by professional actors to circumvent the dramatic monopoly held by the Comédie-Française. Forbidden to perform legitimate drama, they presented their plays in pantomime, interpreting the action with lyrics and choruses set to popular tunes. It eventually developed into a form of light musical drama, with spoken dialogue interspersed with songs, that was popular throughout Europe.


 

 “Vaudeville.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 24 Dec. 2014. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vaudeville>.
“vaudeville”. Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2014. Web. 24 Dec. 2014
<http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/624129/vaudeville>.

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